Know your enemy- The Islamic State

Marine Corps University’s* Center for Advanced Operational Cultural Learning put together an excellent presentation describing how ISIS came to be, what it is, and how it operates. It is your required reading for the day.

[scribd id=292745023 key=key-moEDuIqyKhnLYMc6zpox mode=scroll]

Thanks to the reader who tipped us off.

Via

Darkness in the City of Light

1030073320

The grim counts continue this morning from the ghastly bloodbath in Paris yesterday.  More than 120 killed, and likely more than 200 wounded, about 80 seriously, as reported by multiple sources.  An attack perpetrated by members of the Religion of Peace once again.  A carefully coordinated effort, with killings in at least seven places.  It has been reported that a Syrian passport has been found on the body of one of the terrorists.

While driving north last evening, I was listening to the reports regarding the attacks from CBS News on WBZ radio, and heard our President’s embarrassingly inane remarks.  He talked about the “outrageous attempts to terrorize innocent civilians”, and “terrorize the people of France”, and “universal values”.  Not once did Barack Hussein Obama say the words “ISIS” or “Islam”.  Even though he knew both of those words should have been in every sentence spoken.

Yesterday, President Hollande in France immediately declared a national State of Emergency, and closed the French borders.  But it is too late.  The subway attacks, the massacre in Toulouse, and the Charlie Hebdo shootings have already happened, yet after each, more muslim terrorists were allowed into France.  The socialist Left of Europe, and its imbecilic genuflecting at the altar of “multi-culturalism”, has let the wolves into the herd of sheep.

What happened in France will happen here.  It already has, actually, and continues to.  Fort Hood.  Chattanooga, Austin TX.  Boston. The perpetrator of the stabbings last week at UC-Merced, Faisal Muhammed, left a manifesto of muslim extremism that included desires to behead victims, and praise to Allah.  (Another “unclear motive”, courtesy of our Federal law enforcement friends!)

Some things we don’t know yet about the tragedy in Paris, but will very likely eventually find out:

  • The number of terrorists directly involved in the Paris attacks will be well under 30.
  • A number of them will be recent arrivals from the Middle East, active and trained agents of terrorism from ISIS (and possibly Al Qaeda) sent as “refugees” for the purposes of carrying out such attacks.
  • The terrorists planned and prepared for these attacks in near-complete security nestled inside heavily muslim neighborhoods across France, if not in and around Paris itself.
  • The terrorists used communications methods that defied electronic and visual surveillance, and carried out what can only be described as professional reconnaissance of their targets, likely in plain sight, over a period of months.
  • French security forces were prevented at some junctures from investigating or acting against one or more of the terrorists by politically correct rules in place to keep from offending the muslims.
  • None of the victims were armed, because of France’s extremely strict gun laws.  Yet, the terrorists had easy access to fully-automatic AK-47s, ammunition, and explosives.  The entirety of France is a “gun-free zone”, and the results were predictable.

Military-age muslim men continue to overrun Europe with the stated intent of the destruction of Western civilization.  They have no intention of assimilation, only conquest and conversion.  The memes of the liberal global media, that these are “refugees”, helpless women and children, continue to be perpetuated to an ignorant and brainwashed populace.   Our President has been vocal and active to allow them here, as well.  He wants 10,000 Syrian “refugees” allowed into our country.  The first have already arrived on US soil.

Here’s an idea.  That first load, which consists of almost exclusively military-age males, should be kept in a holding camp near New Orleans.  Michelle Obama, Sasha, and Malia should be made to stay with them inside the camp, sans any Secret Service protection.  Because if he is unwilling to risk their lives and safety with these filthy animals, why should he be willing to risk ours?

Sharia_europe

He won’t risk them, of course.  He will only risk us.  His hackneyed fabrication that there is no one religion responsible for terrorism tells us all we need to know about Barack Hussein Obama.  France and islam are mortal enemies in a war for the soul of the West.  Despite his pathetic platitudes about “universal values” and, now, standing with France, Barack Obama stands with islam.  He has told us so, with his words, and with every action he has taken in his time in office.  American and islam are also mortal enemies in the war for the soul of the West.

Paris, the City of Light, is dark tonight.  In time, it will be an American city that will be shrouded in blood and tears, and darkness.   Perpetrated by the people whom our President stands with.  The same President who called ISIS the “junior varsity”, and as recently as yesterday, told us ISIS was “contained”.  This is the same President who wants us forcibly disarmed, for our own safety.

SECNAV Mabus Ignores Evidence, Criticizes Marine Infantry Study, Pushes Progressive Feminist Agenda

mabusbigger

One has the distinct feeling that Navy Secretary Ray Mabus would have criticized a study that determined that water was wet, if he believed it would be detrimental to furthering the far-left secular progressive agenda.  He was sworn to support and defend the Constitution of the United States, but instead supports his radical left-wing political patrons, and defends their radical social and economic agenda.   Against all evidence, foreign or domestic.

The US Marine Corps recently released a rather comprehensive nine-month study regarding male-female integrated infantry units, confirming what any objective analysis would already have made clear.  Female-integrated units were significantly outperformed by male-only infantry units in nearly every infantry task.

Mabus, however, instead of acknowledging the results and admitting that such integration is a poor idea that will erode espirit de corps, unit integrity, and combat effectiveness, instead attacked the study, making claims about the selected volunteers that were directly and categorically refuted by those Marines who ran the study.

His assertions, of course, hint strongly at the prototypical activism found in the Obama appointees.  The study wasn’t “right” because it produced results counter to the trumpeted meme of the feminist zealots.  He plans to ignore the study, as well as the advice of recently-retired career Marine combat Veteran infantrymen, and the wisdom of a three-war Commandant.  Then he will once again say he “sees no reason” for the combat exemption.

Because Ray Mabus is a liar.  He lacks integrity and character.  His word is worthless, and he is without honor.  His tenure as Navy Secretary has done and will continue to do irreparable damage, and is a stain on the Naval Services.  He is unworthy of respect, or trust.  He will sacrifice a long and brilliant combat record of the United States Marine Corps for a feminist talking point he knows will have a corrosive impact on combat effectiveness.  And he will do so without blinking an eye.

“It’s my call”, he told NPR.  I cannot, in good conscience, advise a young man (or woman) to join the ranks of my beloved Corps while ANYTHING is his call, nor could I tell a parent to trust the life of their child to the Navy or Marines while Mabus is SECNAV.  Because he cares nothing for them, only for his political patrons and his own corrupt and disingenuous skin.

*********************************************

I see our humble host beat me to it by eleven minutes.  But what the hell.  I am leaving this one up here.  Mabus deserves stronger words than I used, to be sure.

To Hear the Media Tell It….

suspect-picture-charleston-shooting-jpg

This murderer is representative of all white people, and white people should feel responsible for his actions, because we all secretly want to murder black people.

150716181615-tease-mohammod-youssuf-abdulazeez-large-169

This murderer’s motive were unclear, but they are certain he is not representative whatsoever of Islam, and anyone thinking otherwise is Islamophobic, and should be ashamed of themselves for thinking so.

Got it?  Easy enough.

June 25th, 1950

tank03

Today marks the 65th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War.  Most of us here know that the war itself has not ended, that the DPRK and the ROK remain in a state of war, temporarily becalmed by an armistice signed in July of 1953.

The war was fought by Veterans of World War II, as well as their little brothers.  There were more than 36,000 US killed in action among the more than 130,000 American casualties in that war, many times the order of magnitude of Iraq and Afghanistan combined.  In just over three years.   There are lessons aplenty from that war regarding preparedness, combat training, leadership, and budget-driven assumptions.

There are several superlative works on the Korean War, fiction and non-fiction.  Here are some I recommend highly:

T. R. Fehrenbach’s This Kind of War

James Brady’s The Coldest War

Two Martin Russ works, The Last Parallel, and Breakout.

S. L. A. Marshall’s The River and the Gauntlet

Pat Frank’s magnificent novel Hold Back the Night

P. K. O’Donnell’s Give me Tomorrow

Clay Blair’s The Forgotten War

There are many, many others, including some incredibly good Army monographs, but those are among my favorites.  I lent out Marshall’s book some years ago (you know who you are!!) and never got it back.  So that may be my next purchase.

Anyway, the first test of the Strategy of Containment began in the early hours, sixty-five years ago this morning.

Somewhere, Red Mike Edson is Smiling

Marine_Raiders_insignia.svg

From Marine Corps Times:

An official flagging ceremony to rename Marine special operations battalions in honor of their World War II predecessors is set to take place June 19, MARSOC officials confirmed. The ceremony comes 10 months after the command first announced its plan to change the names of Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command’s component units to reflect their history.

The formal renaming was held up while Headquarters Marine Corps approved a bulletin announcing the upcoming change, said Capt. Barry Morris, a MARSOC spokesman. He said MARSOC’s headquarters in Sneads Ferry, North Carolina, also had to coordinate with its major subordinate elements to determine a date for the ceremony.

The Corps does a lot of goofy sh*t sometimes, but we do cherish our traditions.  Love the skull patch, too.  It will remind people that the job of the Raiders, and the USMC writ large, is to kill.  Destroy the enemy.

Semper Fi, Raiders!

Slowing down the encroachment of lawfare- It’s Israel’s fault.

No really.

Various norms have evolved over the course of man’s history in regards to the conduct of warfare. Chivalry, for example. With the vastly increased lethality of 20th century weapons, many nations sought to minimize the suffering of both combatants and noncombatants, and codified these through a series of agreements that have come to be known as the Geneva Convention. 

Mind you, the key precepts of the laws of land warfare were written with a view of warfare between nation states and their organized armies.

Today, however, we’ve seen that much of warfare consists of non-state organizations, outside the norms that existed when the bulk of the Geneva Conventions were drafted.  Reciprocity was the main means of encouraging compliance. You don’t use poison gas on us, we won’t use it on you. But international law has struggled to keep pace with the changes. One problem is that while nation states are constrained in their actions by the law, there is actually an incentive for non-state actors to willfully flaunt the norms of warfare.

Still and all, it is generally in a nation state’s own interests to abide by the acceptable laws of warfare. Neither you nor I would truly like to see our services wantonly killing non-combatants simply for the sake of killing or satisfying our bloodlust. On the other hand, we’ve seen rules of engagement that have become ever more complex, restrictive, and burdensome that legitimate targets of war have been spared either through delays in approval or fears of collateral damage.

Arguably no nation has gone so far out of its way to minimize civilian casualties in its military operations as Israel in its recent conflicts in the Gaza Strip.  Routinely, the IDF will phone the homes surrounding a target and plead for the occupants to flee to safety. They’ve developed a tactic called “roof knocking” where a small guided rocket will hit the roof of a target to emphasize that a larger warhead is shortly enroute, to again encourage innocents to flee. 

And now, Israel is being criticized for these humanitarian techniques.

As a result, he expressed his fear that the IDF “is setting an unreasonable precedent for other democratic countries of the world who may also be fighting in asymmetric wars against brutal non-state actors who abuse these laws.”

Sharing his assessment was Pnina Sharvit Baruch, a senior researcher at the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS) and former Dabla chief.

She said legal advisers from other militaries around the world confront her with “recurring claims” that the IDF “is going too far in its self-imposed restrictions intended to protect civilians, and that this may cause trouble down the line for other democratic nations fighting organized armed groups.”

Michael Schmitt, director of the Stockton Center for the Study for International Law at the US Naval War College, also agreed that the IDF is creating a dangerous state of affairs that may harm the West in its fight against terrorism.

As noted, some people will instantly conclude that any military operation by any nation that doesn’t adhere to this technique will quickly come to be labeled as a war crime. The problem is, Israel’s ability to use these techiques, particularly the phone calls, is due to its unique relationship with Gaza and its in depth intelligence of the organization and structure of its opponents political and military arms.  No other nation faces such a foe that it could in fact pursue these techniques.

A Scathing Indictment of the Wounded Warrior Project

Over on the porch.  Well worth the read.

I haven’t liked that organization for quite some time, mostly because of the way they portray wounded Veterans as being objects of pity.  Salamander puts it better than I have been able to.

an organization that uses the same visuals, tone and background music for those who fight our wars, that are are also used for starving African children … and at the same time squash local organizations using a huge legal budget.

Touché.

Here is some perspective, without minimizing the sacrifice.  The total US combat wounded in 13 years in Iraq and Afghanistan numbers around 52,000, with the vast majority being minor wounds with RTD (return to duty), such as mine were.  (Of the approximately 1,400 wounded suffered by 1st Marine Division in Anbar from February-September 2004, about 1,200 were RTD.  If those percentages hold for the larger number of 52,000, the total number with wounds serious enough to prevent a return to duty numbers around 7,500.)  We know that the number of traumatic amputations is fewer than 1,600.  This means, with just the last three years of donations, WWP has received enough money for almost $100,000 for each of the 7,500 seriously wounded Vets, or $457,000 for each traumatic amputee.  This is on top of the medical care and equipment provided by the VA for these Veterans.

With a CEO salary of almost half a million a year, the selling of donor lists, and this sort of reprehensible behavior:

According to a number of smaller groups, the Wounded Warrior Project…  has been spending a good deal of time and money suing other veteran-serving nonprofits on the basis that their names or logos constitute infringement on their brand.

I agree with Salamander, not a dime to WWP from me.  I will give to a smaller charity in a heartbeat.  One that does not make helping our wounded Veterans a “common business practice”, and one that does not intentionally harm others trying to give back to those who gave so much.

UPDATE:  XBradTC here. C0ncur all and endorse original message. There are many fine organizations to donate to, and it’s your money. But I would like to mention one that does have a sterling reputation, Fisher House.

The Army and Amphibious Warfare- Repost

Here’s a repost of one of the earlier works on the blog, but that might seem fresh to newer readers.

When you mention the words “amphibious warfare” most people think immediately of the US Marines, and rightly so. But during WWII, the Army invested huge resources into the ability to land on a hostile shore and conduct operations.

There are two general types of amphibious operations: ship-to-shore and shore-to-shore. Ship to shore operations are those in which the landing force is transported to the objective in large, ocean going vessels, then landed via small craft onto the shore. Shore to shore operations take place over relatively short distances, and generally the troops are carried in smaller craft, rather than large transports. Obviously, the anticipated objectives will dictate which approach is taken.

In the late 1930s, with war clouds clearly on the horizon, both the Army and the Marines came to the conclusion that they would need to develop a serious amphibious capability, but they reached different conclusions because of very different assumptions about what type  of war they would be fighting.

For 20 years, the Navy had forseen war with Japan in the Pacific. And the cornerstone of the Navy’s strategy to defeat Japan was to defeat the Japanese fleet in a battle, likely somewhere near the Philipines. Since it would be impractical for the fleet to steam all the way from San Diego or Pearl Harbor and fight in those waters, the need for advanced bases was clear. And the Marines understood that as a consequence of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922, any islands that could serve as an advance base would almost certainly be held by the Japanese. That meant the Marines had to be ready to travel the huge distances of the Pacific, land on remote islands, and seize relatively small objectives. For the Marines, this was a raison de etre.

The Army faced a different challenge. The Army had no desire to get into the amphibious warfare business. But watching the rise of Nazi German power, the Army leadership was convinced that sooner or later, they’d have to go fight in Western Europe again. And, unlike 1918, they weren’t at all sure the French ports would be available to land the huge armies planned. After the fall of France in June of 1940, the cold realization came that just to get  the Army to the fight would mean sooner or later, landing somewhere in Western Europe, under the guns of the enemy. And not only would the Army have to land there, they would have to build up their forces and simultaneously supply them over the beaches until a suitable port could be seized. Fortunately for the Army, England was still available as an advance base.

The Army didn’t completely ignore the ship to shore model of amphibious warfare, mostly because they couldn’t. When it became apparent that no cross-Channel operation to invade Europe would be possible in 1942 (mostly because of a lack of landing craft) President Roosevelt made the decision that a front in the Atlantic theater would be opened in North Africa. A combined British and American force would be landed in the French occupied territories of North Africa, then drive east to engage the German forces in  Tunisia. Due to the distances involved, this could only be a ship to shore movement. Many forces sailed from England, but a significant portion sailed all the way from ports on the East Coast of the US. Even against only fitful French and German resistance, the invasion fleet lost five large transports. One of the lessons the Army learned was that transports waiting to discharge their troops and cargoes were extremely vulnerable. In response, the Army wanted to make sure as many ships as possible had the ability to beach themselves to unload, minimizing the reliance on small craft such as the Higgins boat, LCVP, and the LCM.

LCM(3) (Landing Craft Mechanized Model 3)
LCM(3) (Landing Craft Mechanized Model 3)
Higgins Boat (Landing Craft Personnel Light)
Higgins Boat (Landing Craft Personnel Light)
LCVP (Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel)
LCVP (Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel)

These craft were carried near the objective by transports, and lowered over the side by booms or davits. That took time, time during which the transports, only 5-10 miles offshore, were vulnerable to submarines, airplanes and even coastal artillery.  While they were fairly good for getting the first units of lightly armed troops ashore, they were less efficient at getting ashore the huge numbers of follow-on troops needed, and importantly, the massive numbers of vehicles the troops would need to break out from any beachhead. Further, they just weren’t capable of bringing ashore the cargoes of supplies, fuel and ammunition the troops would need.  Something bigger was needed. And the first of these bigger craft was known as the LCT, or Landing Craft Tank. An LCM3 could carry one tank, barely. An LCT was a much bigger craft and could carry from 3 to 5 tanks. Five was an optimum number, as that was the number of tanks in a platoon, and keeping tactical units together on a landing greatly assisted in the assualt. As you can see from the picture, the LCT was essentially a self-propelled barge with a bow-ramp.

2lctmk5pageThe LCT could easily sail from England to France, or from Mediterranean ports in North Africa to Sicily and Italy. And while it could carry real numbers of tanks, something even better was in the works- the Landing Ship Tank, or LST. Early in the war, espcially as the Allies were first gearing up  for the invasion of North Africa, the Army (and especially the British) realized they had no way of shipping tanks overseas and landing them across beaches in any numbers. The LCT couldn’t handle the voyage, and loading LCMs over the side of a transport was problematic in anything but a flat calm. Worse, tanks kept getting heavier and heavier, faster than the booms on transport ships could grow to handle them. The idea arose of converting vessels originally built to carry rail cars from Florida to Panama as tank carriers. But while they could drive the tanks on at the embarkation point, the problem of discharging them remained. To unload them, the Army would need to seize a port. Indeed, this limitation was precisley why Casablanca was a target of the invasion. Enter the British. They had built a series of very shallow draft tankers to serve the waters around Venezuala. The reasoned that the design could quickly be adapted to build a large vessel that could safely beach itself, unload tanks held in what had formerly been the holds via a ramp in the bow, and then retract itself from the beach. Unlike an LCT, the LST might be ungainly and slow, but it was a real seagoing vessel.

LST (Landing Ship Tank)
LST (Landing Ship Tank)

While the LST was very valuable in bringing tanks, up to 20 at a time, it turns out the real value was in trucks. The Army in WWII was by far the most mechanized and motorized army in the world. And that meant trucks. Lots of trucks- to move people, supplies, tow guns, you name it. And the LST could carry a lot of trucks, already loaded, both on its tank deck, and on the topsides. And unlike the hassle of unloading a regular transport, all they had to do was drive down a ramp. After making an initial assault, as soon as an LST had discharged its tanks, it would turn around, go back to England (or where ever) and load up on trucks to build up the forces on the beachhead. To say the LST was a success would be a bit of an understatement. The US built roughly 1100 of them during the war for our Navy and the British.

While the LST was great for carrying tanks and trucks, it didn’t do so well at carrying people. One thing the Army really wanted was a small ship that could carry a rifle company from England and land them on the shores of France, non-stop and as a unit. The trick was getting the size just right. It had to be small enough to be built in large numbers, but big enough to cross the Atlantic on its own. It wouldn’t be expected to carry troops across the Atlantic. Those would come across on troopships. But any vessel large enough to do the job would be too large to carry aboard a transport. Pretty soon, the Navy designed and built the Landing Craft Infantry, or LCI. This was a vessel designed almost entirely with the invasion of Normandy in mind. It carried about 200 troops, roughly a reinforced rifle company, for up to 48 hours, which is about the time it took to load and transport them from ports in the Southwest of England and discharge them over the beaches of Normandy.

LCI (Landing Craft Infantry)
LCI (Landing Craft Infantry)

The Army had one other great tool for bringing supplies across the beach. In the days before the LST was available, the only method of getting trucks ashore across the beach was to winch them over the side of  a transport into an LCM. Someone at GM had the bright idea of doing away with the LCM part, and making the truck amphibious. That way, the truck could swim ashore, then drive inland to the supply dumps.  The result was basically a boat hull grafted onto a 2-1/2 ton truck, known as the DUKW, and commonly called a “duck.” Thousands of DUKWs, almost all manned by African American soldiers, brought wave after wave of critical supplies ashore across the beaches of Normandy and at other beaches the Army invaded. Unlike most landing craft, these were bought by, and operated by the Army, not the Navy.

DUKW Amphibious 2-1/2 ton truck
DUKW Amphibious 2-1/2 ton truck

Finally, in the Pacific, when you speak of amphibious warfare, again, you rightly think of the Marines. But in fact, the Army had a huge presence there as well. Indeed, it was always a larger prescence than the Marines. The Army made over 100 amphibious assualts in the Pacific theater, many in the Southwest Pacific in and around New Guinea. In conjunction with the US Seventh Fleet, MacArthur’s forces in the Southwest Pacific became masters at the art of amphibious warfare, striking where the Japanese least expected them, and routinely conducting sweeping flanking movements that left Japanese garrisons cut off and useless. Dan Barbey, the Commander of 7th Fleet became known as “Uncle Dan The Amphibious Man.” All this with a fleet mostly composed of tiny LCTs, a few LSTs and LCIs.

The Army also fought alongside the Marine Corps in some of their most storied battles, such as the invasions of Saipan and Okinawa. Indeed, if the atomic bomb attacks had not lead to the early surrender of Japan, the invasion of the home islands would have been mostly  an Army affair. Largely as a result of the Army’s preocupation with the European theater, these magnificent efforts have received little attention from the public at large.

After WWII, the Army’s focus again turned to Europe and the Cold War. For several reasons, including the vulnerability of shipping to nuclear weapons, amphibious operations fell out of favor with the Army. The Marines of course, continued to maintain that unique capabilty. Currently, the Army has no capability to conduct a landing against opposition. Current doctrine does still provide for limited ability to sustain forces by what is known as LOTS or “Logistics Over The Shore” and for the rapid deployment of troop units to hot spots via Afloat Prepositioning Squadrons. Basically, sets of unit equipment are mainained aboard large ships just days sailing from their possible objectives. If needed, they can sail to a friendly port or harbor, and unload their cargoes to meet up with troops flown in by either commercial aircraft or military transport planes. Alternatively, they can serve as a follow-on force to reinforce a beach seized by Marine amphibious assault.