Why there’s Ground Zero steel in West Point class rings | New York Post

When graduates of West Point’s Class of 2016 go into their years of service as officers of the Army, they will be wearing something no other cadets have worn before — class rings that include steel from the World Trade Center. It hasn’t received mention in the press. But it was movingly noted Friday in the introduction of the commandant of cadets, Brig. Gen. John Thomson III, at the military academy’s annual ring memorial ceremony. What a cure for the cynicism of a cynical age. It’s at the ring ceremony that seniors — known as “firsties” — get their rings, which become a physical link between future officers and the West Point graduates who went before. The ceremony takes place at one of the most beautiful places in America — Trophy Point. The trophies, which are cannons captured in 1812 and other wars, look out over a slope giving north into the Hudson River.

Source: Why there’s Ground Zero steel in West Point class rings | New York Post

Read the whole thing. The “ring melt” ceremony is seriously interesting. The Army traditionally doesn’t have as much pomp and circumstance as the Marines, or even the Navy. And most of what we do have is centered on West Point. But when the Army, particularly West Point, does get around to pomp and circumstance, they do it quite right.

2 thoughts on “Why there’s Ground Zero steel in West Point class rings | New York Post”

  1. Cool.

    On a tangent, though, the army does occasionally get the history and ceremony right. One that I particularly like is that they’ve incorporated soil from multiple battlefields on the graduation parade field at Fort Benning so as you advance across it you pass through history. My alma mater of The Old Guard did some ceremonies right, too… Even if I really hated standing through them.

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