US Army to acquire enhanced MH-47G Block 2 Chinooks – IHS Jane’s 360

The US Army is looking to renew production of the Boeing MH-47G Chinook special mission helicopter in an upgraded Block 2 configuration, it disclosed on 3 August.

With production of the final eight Block 1 MH-47Gs set to be complete by the end of the year, the US Army Aviation Integration Directorate is proposing the resumption of production after this date to deliver an undisclosed number of additional MH-47G helicopters in a Block 2 configuration, according to a solicitation posted on the Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps) website.

The US Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) currently fields 61 remanufactured Block 1 MH-47Gs (62 were delivered – 35 CH-47Ds, nine MH-47Ds and 18 MH-47Es – although one was lost on operations in Afghanistan). The USASOC is to receive the additional eight new-build MH-47Gs by the end of 2015 to offset the fleet’s high operational tempo.

via US Army to acquire enhanced MH-47G Block 2 Chinooks – IHS Jane’s 360.

Two items of interest here. First, the new build G models. The Chinook fleet overall is in very good shape, with new F models replacing the D fleet. The F models (and the G models) are rebuilds of D models. Which, most of the D models were rebuilt from earlier models. I would be curious to know which Chinook out there is the oldest, when it actually rolled off the production line the first time.  Over the years, however, attrition has reduced the total inventory enough that some new builds are required.

Second, at the bottom of the linked article, there’s talk about a new Advanced Chinook Helicopter blade, which promises to use somewhat different geometry. How that will work, I don’t know. The new blades offer in increase in payload of a whopping six tons or so!

5 thoughts on “US Army to acquire enhanced MH-47G Block 2 Chinooks – IHS Jane’s 360”

  1. Xbad,
    I would be interested to learn about the new blades.
    As an ex DoD helicopter mech, having carried a few of those blades, while there was a great controversy between the metal-blade folks and the composite-blade folks.
    Here in the PNW, the metal-blade folks were all about:
    In the winter the composite blades sag and crack and rain-water gets in there.
    I can see that in the dry climates that the composites would rock, not here.
    Did I read the article? No.
    But then, I’m drinking. Don’t harsh my mellow…

  2. “The new blades offer in increase in payload of a whopping six tons or so!”

    Color me skeptical.

    1. Perhaps Esli. Color me skeptical, but not just from an aerodynamic standpoint. What would it take to strengthen the structure to carry that addition 12,000 ponds.

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