Russia Jamming Technology Poses Challenge for Allied Forces, U.S. Officials Say – WSJ

Sophisticated Russian electronic-warfare systems and jamming technology are posing an acute challenge for allied forces training in Eastern Europe, U.S. Army officials said Tuesday.

While the U.S. has sold sophisticated radios to many allied nations, including Baltic countries, U.S. export regulations prohibit the military from sharing the most secure encryption that would prevent Russians from intercepting and decoding transmissions.

U.S. officials said Russia has invested heavily in technology designed to both intercept communications and jam radio transmissions, and it has developed new equipment to identify the source of allied transmissions. Intelligence officials also say Russia has become better at masking its own communications to keep its planned military movements secret.

via Russia Jamming Technology Poses Challenge for Allied Forces, U.S. Officials Say – WSJ.

The headline touts Russian jamming, but none of the quotes support the headline. If Russia was actively jamming US and Lithuanian comms during the recent exercise, well, that would be pretty interesting.

Are the Russians using signals intelligence to try to intercept our communications? Sure. That’s how the game is played.  The US certainly spends enough time and effort intercepting Russian comms.

As to swapping liaison NCOs, that’s probably going to happen regardless of what types of radios each unit carries.

3 thoughts on “Russia Jamming Technology Poses Challenge for Allied Forces, U.S. Officials Say – WSJ”

  1. Home on jam! Isn’t that what the JDAMs did to those GPS jammers the Russians gave Saddam?

    1. They’re a little short on details of how it works, but I strongly suspect that it’s not barrage jamming.

  2. I have always been a little leery of the Army’s increasing reliance on networking. It may be digital instead of analog, and they may use frequency hopping and a broad spectrum, but some nodes are still going to be radiating a lot of power more or less continuously.

    Plus, I believe some of the electronic components are manufactured overseas.

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