Roamy roundup

Wednesday was the 50th anniversary of the first spacewalk. Alexei Leonov shares his thoughts.
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnREkhEOKBE&w=560&h=315]
Ed White would make the first American spacewalk on June 3, 1965 during the Gemini 4 mission. Both men had trouble with their helmets fogging up, which led to better cooling systems in future spacesuits.

Speaking of anniversaries, the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope is next month. There is the NASA version of March Mania where you can vote for your favorite Hubble image. This telescope was designed to be serviced by astronauts, and still they had to repair items not meant to be monkeyed with in microgravity. One example is the imaging spectrograph, repaired during the last servicing mission. Goddard designed this fastener capture plate to hold the 111 fasteners (#4 and #8 size).
capture plate
Between Hubble and ISS, it is amazing what we can do with spacewalks.

If you ever want to fly an experiment on the International Space Station, NASA is creating researcher’s guides for each discipline.

I had posted the 5-segment booster test and thankfully didn’t repeat the public relations error about it being the most powerful booster test ever. NASAWatch sets the record straight with the Wikipedia entry for Aerojet’s motor firing of 5.88 million pounds thrust.

Between Sept. 25, 1965 and June 17, 1967, three static test firings were done. SL-1 was fired at night, and the flame was clearly visible from Miami 50 km away, producing over 3 million pounds of thrust. SL-2 was fired with similar success and relatively uneventful. SL-3, the third and what would be the final test rocket, used a partially submerged nozzle and produced 2,670,000 kgf thrust, making it the largest solid-fuel rocket ever.

And that is the Roamy roundup for today.

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