China Announces ADIZ over disputed islands.

 

China’s Ministry of National Defense issued an announcement of the aircraft identification rules for the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone of the People’s Republic of China.p Following is the full text:

Announcement of the Aircraft Identification Rules for the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone of the People’s Republic of China

Issued by the Ministry of National Defense on November 23

The Ministry of National Defense of the People’s Republic of China, in accordance with the Statement by the Government of the People’s Republic of China on Establishing the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone, now announces the Aircraft Identification Rules for the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone as follows:

First, aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must abide by these rules.

Second, aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must provide the following means of identification:

1. Flight plan identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone should report the flight plans to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China or the Civil Aviation Administration of China.

2. Radio identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must maintain the two-way radio communications, and respond in a timely and accurate manner to the identification inquiries from the administrative organ of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone or the unit authorized by the organ.

3. Transponder identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone, if equipped with the secondary radar transponder, should keep the transponder working throughout the entire course.

4. Logo identification. Aircraft flying in the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone must clearly mark their nationalities and the logo of their registration identification in accordance with related international treaties.

The US establishment of an air defense system over the nation and Canada in the Cold War coincided with both the potential threat of a Soviet bomber attack, and the increase in commercial trans-oceanic flights. To give interceptors time and space to scramble to meet any potential threat, all flights that would enter US or Canadian airspace were required to identify themselves clearly, by filing a flight plan, operating a transponder, and establishing two-way radio communications with air traffic control. Any aircraft not meeting these requirements would potentially find itself intercepted by Air Defense Command, and identified, escorted, or even forced to land.   This zone was known as an Air Defense Identification Zone or ADIZ. Theoretically, failure to comply with ADC could even result in being shot down. The US wasn’t big on shooting down airliners, but as Korean Air 007 showed,violating  the Soviet equivalent of an ADIZ  could be deadly.

No one is really challenging the right of China to have an ADIZ over its territory. The establishment of an ADIZ over disputed international waters, however, is an extreme provocation. Almost certainly, every commercial carrier that transits the area will comply.  Failure to do so would cause virtually every insurer to cancel coverage.

But to simply accede to this pronouncement would be a de facto admission by other governments that China’s assertion of an ADIZ is legitimate. Japan especially, and perhaps other governments, will likely challenge the validity of the ADIZ. And they’ll do so with military aircraft.

This is an escalation that will lead to one side or the other losing face, or one side or the other losing airplanes. And probably lives.

9 thoughts on “China Announces ADIZ over disputed islands.”

    1. It’s almost as if the Red Chinks are trying to provoke a war. Japan, however, can’t afford to back down. I think you will see commercial air traffic avoid the region.

  1. And it is in play the same day it is announced? Hmm. A number of recent fiction books (Thor, Poyer, Clancy?) have described China exerting control over the South China Sea, international waters or not. This is the first I’ve seen on the East China Sea. As QM says, cannot see Japan backing down. Or Taiwan, Korea & a few other countries. Interesting times…

  2. When I first saw this ( in a link at Glenn Reynolds ), I thought that wihin six to 18 months the PRC will be in a war with someone, or several someones.

    Paul

  3. Want to stop this? Here’s a thought experiment.

    Have a heavy civ aircraft not get clearance. Look for vectored Chinese fighters over deep water. Pop up some low flying F-22s and a EA-18G (or other equivalents), Jam comms and splash the Chinese fighters. No publicity. Rinse and repeat for an effective deterrent.

    It would take courage, leadership, willpower and good OPSEC. So the US is unable to do this due to NCA failings. The ability is there in the USAF, USN, RSAF, JASDF, and ROKAF. A combined operation would be more diplomatic. And it’s better to demonstrate a limited offense vice playing catch-up.

    1. The Telegraph reported (http://preview.tinyurl.com/l4mdy9u) that Chinese VP aircraft were accompanied by AWACs and fighters as they went over Japanese territory.

      This makes a peaceful resolution more unlikely.

      Look for the four KC-767s to move south from Tokyo, with some of the four E-767s and more F-15J Kais to show up in Naha.

  4. Take an east asia history 101, then you will know Potsdam Declaration and Cairo Communiqué said:

    “Japanese sovereignty shall be limited to the islands of Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu, Shikoku and such minor islands as we determine.” As had been announced in the Cairo Declaration in 1943.

    Who is trying to change the rule set by world war II? Did the above wording clear enough?

    Only another world war can change the rule of world war II, just like a decision of a meeting can’t be changed by a few persons in a dark room without calling another meeting with all previous attendees invited. Whoever challenge the rule of world war II is an aggressor in this world. Whoever challenge the rule of world war II is calling or creating a world war III.

  5. Just a few hard facts:

    1. Japan had ADIZ since 1969, the area of Japan’s ADIZ is 5 times the Japan’s domestic territory area. While China’s ADIZ area is a fraction (<10%) of their territory area.
    2. US developed the ADIZ back in 1950.
    3. There are 20+ countries had their own ADIZ in this world, including Korea, Japan, RC (republic of China, Taiwan area), Phillipine, etc.
    4. China publicly acknowledged they may consider withdrawal ADIZ, conditionally on Japan withdrawal their 1st, after 44 years of Japan’s withdrawal.
    5. When Korea, Japan, RC (republic of China, Taiwan area), Phillipine set up their own ADIZ, none of these countries consulted China.

    What US should do is to patent the ADIZ back in 1950s. Then all the 20+ countries have to pay US loyalty for using the ADIZ system, including China.

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