Insect-repelling Uniforms now available to all Soldiers | Army & Land Forces News at DefenceTalk

Factory-treated, insect-repelling Army Combat Uniforms that until now were issued only to Soldiers deploying to Iraq, Afghanistan, and some other overseas locations, will now be available to all Soldiers.

The new uniform, called the “ACU-P,” uses the chemical permethrin to ward off insects such as ticks, mosquitoes, fleas and chiggers. Permethrin has been extensively tested and found to be safe by the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Agriculture, and Food and Drug Administration, said Col. Pearline McKenzie-Garner, an occupational medicine physician in the Office of the Surgeon General.

Insect-repelling Uniforms now available to all Soldiers | Army & Land Forces News at DefenceTalk

via Insect-repelling Uniforms now available to all Soldiers | Army & Land Forces News at DefenceTalk.

The ever increasing costs of combat uniforms means eventually the Army will either have to return to a “direct exchange/direct issue” pattern, where unit supply treats uniforms like other organizational clothing, or the Army will have to adopt a low-cost garrison uniform, and only issue combat uniforms from war-stocks. In effect, that’s what we’re doing today with troops deploying to Afghanistan. Troops deploying to Afghanistan are issued Multi-cam pattern ACUs, at no cost, and leave their grey/green ACUs at home.

So why not make it official?

4 thoughts on “Insect-repelling Uniforms now available to all Soldiers | Army & Land Forces News at DefenceTalk”

  1. Every can of Permethrin I saw had a warning label that it was not to be applied directly to the skin. It’s really great stuff though. I’d spray it on my pants and I never got ticks or chiggers when Surveying In Tennessee. Would have been nice to have some at Camp Shelby to keep the Chiggers (or red bugs as they call them in MS) off us.

  2. We have been issuing from war stocks since at least 2008, when units got a set of flame-retardant ACUs to wear overseas. Didn’t have to turn them back in, but they are on my non-OCIE clothing record.

  3. My queston is, how does the coating stand up to laundering. Or starching? Or pressing? Because if my experience has any relevance, there will be garrison commanders who demand that solders keep their combat uniforms in garrison condition (i.e. inspection ready pressed).

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