Soldiers Could Go Reptilian with New Camo | Military.com

This month, soldiers will begin testing a camouflage pattern that looks more like reptile scales than terrain as part of the field-trial portion of the Army’s camouflage improvement effort.

The start of the field evaluation comes five months after Army uniform officials announced the finalists that had emerged from the service’s exhaustive Phase IV Camouflage Improvement effort. A handful of vendors were awarded contracts to make camouflage-patterned material for uniforms and equipment. Ultimately, the winner’s pattern could end up replacing the Army’s embattled Universal Camouflage Pattern, known as UCP, which was adopted in 2004.

via Soldiers Could Go Reptilian with New Camo | Military.com.

Really, unless there’s a terrible clash between the colors of the uniform and the background, the pattern just doesn’t matter that much.  Tweaking the pattern is an exercise in diminishing returns.

In mounted warfare, it really doesn’t matter what pattern you wear.

In dismounted, light infantry, most folks don’t get spotted (or not) because of the uniform. Movement is the thing that catches the eye.

The only good thing about the ACU was adapting the uniform for wear with body armor. The old BDU uniform had a four-pocket coat in which all pockets were covered when wearing armor.

The “multi-cam” pattern uniform issued for use in Afghanistan is quite good, from a camouflage perspective. The Army would have done well to just adopt it across the board.

Heck, just abandoning camo and going to a single color uniform would have been fine. Oddly, olive drab (or really, Olive Green 107) isn’t the best color. Green really sticks out in a lot of places.  The brown shade from the old BDU pattern would be a better choice.

4 thoughts on “Soldiers Could Go Reptilian with New Camo | Military.com”

  1. What a waste of money here. ACUs were also a waste, however. No need for high-tech. lightweight, durable cloth with some pattern of appropriate colors and doesn’t fall apart at the seams would be much more valuable. As for the mounted warrior comment, I recall my fellow PL taking his tank platoon up to Fort Bragg one time and getting chewed out by some captain for being forward in the training area in violation of the facepaint policy. How ludicrous, four 69 ton tanks rolling around in their tan paint job but worried that we can see the crew (or not in the case of the gunner and driver).
    Brad, See back to the last cold war casualty for the highlights of my granddad.

  2. Are we back-to-the-future here with the old WW II plain khakis? (“Brown shades?”)

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