Civil War shipwreck creates hurdle for government’s $653M plan

Craig? Any other American Civil War aficionados here? This might be up your alley.

Before government engineers can deepen one of the nation’s busiest seaports to accommodate future trade, they first need to remove a $14 million obstacle from the past — a Confederate warship rotting on the Savannah River bottom for nearly 150 years.

Confederate troops scuttled the ironclad CSS Georgia to prevent its capture by Gen. William T. Sherman when his Union troops took Savannah in December 1864. It’s been on the river bottom ever since.

Now, the Civil War shipwreck sits in the way of a government agency’s $653 million plan to deepen the waterway that links the nation’s fourth-busiest container port to the Atlantic Ocean. The ship’s remains are considered so historically significant that dredging the river is prohibited within 50 feet of the wreckage.

via Civil War shipwreck creates hurdle for government’s $653M plan | Fox News.

Actually, I guarantee Craig has already seen this. I can never find a tidbit of ACW news that he hasn’t already seen or written about.

4 thoughts on “Civil War shipwreck creates hurdle for government’s $653M plan”

  1. “The ship’s remains are considered so historically significant that dredging the river is prohibited within 50 feet of the wreckage.”

    Why? A quick google search fails to indicate that the Georgia did anything militarily significant. At most it delayed the capture of Savannah by two years.

    The problem with history is that more of it is created every day. If we had hung onto every ship commissioned we would have long ago run out of berthings. I think it would be far better to collect what artifacts we can, dredge the channel, and possibly built a replica and float it near Fort Jackson.

    1. “Why? A quick google search fails to indicate that the Georgia did anything militarily significant. At most it delayed the capture of Savannah by two years.”

      Simple answer – there are only a handful of ships, even wrecks, that trace back to the Confederate Navy. Although no sailors (that we know of) were on the ship when it sank, there’s a large number of artifacts down there that would speak to their service. Decades ago, the decision was made to recover the ship… pending funds.

      So… if the port of Savannah wants to make the channel bigger, then they should pony up the money to recover as much of the CSS Georgia as possible.

  2. Yanno, this brings to mind the Vasa and the Mary Rose. Both of great historical significance, and both eventually raised & preserved.

    I don’t see why there’s a problem with that, Given the quoted estimate of recovery in the linked article, compared to the plan for expansion, it’s a no-brainer for Georgia.

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